We are entering the final chapter of the experience with Nunya’s nasal tumor.  Nunya and Alison met with the staff at Texas A&M in an emergency appointment due to her labored breathing.  Nunya was unable to get any sleep at all last night, and it was obvious she was uncomfortable.   Two options were presented, the first being another round of radiation/tomotherapy that would consist of 10 sessions for $3-4,000 that should open up her breathing.  We were warned that she has already received a lifetime time dosage of radiation and that most likely the burns would be severe and she could have massive destruction of the remaining structure in her nose.  Option two is pain management with Tramadol until plans were in place to put her to sleep.

At the end of option one, we would most likely see the regrowth of the tumor at the same rate.  So, while Alison and I have always believed that we would do anything to extend her life, we feel this treatment option is not prolonging her life in a positive fashion.  After experiencing the burns after the first course of tomotherapy, we feel that having severe radiation burns does not seem to be worth the extra week and a half to two weeks.  It has been made clear that the 10 day treatment is not a cure.  Having her undergo anesthesia everyday for ten days was also an increased risk due to her breathing problems.  The best case scenario would be improved breathing, reduced tumor, and a couple of extra months of life, at the same time still having the physical side effects from radiation.  The potential benefits just do not seem worth the risk or the pain she would have to go through.

So here we are a few hours later, after trying to get her to sleep with tramadol and only having luck if we physically hold her mouth open.  We have scheduled her euthanasia for tomorrow around 12pm.  We have less than 24hrs.  This is a hard reality to accept, but after seeing her discomfort and breathing difficulties over the past couple of days we know that there are no more good options.  We are going to do our best to spoil her and love on her in the time we have remaining.  It is hard for us, but we believe is the right thing to do by her.

Update 8/8/13

We would like to thank everyone for the supportive messages and condolences we have received after Nunya’s passing.  It really means a lot to us to see the impact Nunya’s story had.  We miss her very much and it has been hard adjusting to not having her around.  We logically know we made the right decision that the end had come for her, but emotionally it is easy to second guess ourselves.

We will be writing a final update in the near future that describes in detail Nunya’s final days, the symptoms she experienced that made us realize the end was here, and even the details of her passing.  Right now though the feelings are still too fresh and we want to be able to objectively write down our own experience, so we will take some time to gather our thoughts. We want this blog to continue to be as informative as possible for others facing unfortunate similar situations.

8/14/2013

The last week has been rough but we really appreciate all the kind messages we received. It seems that I have been rehashing the events and the decisions on a daily bases. One of the hardest challenges has been removing Nunya’s items from the house. This is something that we have not wanted to rush yet we know one day soon we will need to separate ourselves from all her beds, chewies and toys.

Part of this separation process includes moving Nunya’s journal off of my blog. Alison and I want to be very careful moving this information. We have set up and started to build NunyaTheDog.com and we hope to continue the conversation there. While Nunya’s journey is over, we hope that others will share their experiences and potentially gain insight from ours.

8/24/2013

As time passes I am trying to separate Nunya from my tech blog as it has been a challenge keeping motivated.  I have moved all her cancer content to a new webpage (including the final blog entry on her journey).  Ali and I are still dedicated to sharing the information we have learned through the process and are very thankful to everyone who has read along.


Comments

  1. Leslie -

    I’m sorry to hear that the end has come for your sweet dog. I, too, chose to have my dog Owen put down today, 7 months after diagnosis. He had a great week last week but his nose continued to bleed since Saturday and one eye was being displaced by the tumor. I’m returning to work soon and had such fear leaving him alone in this condition. He received no treatment except Piroxicam and I am thankful he had very little bleeding except the last 2 days. I had 7 months to say good bye and spoil him and it wasn’t enough time. I know there will be other dogs someday, but my recovery from this will take a long time. Prayers for everyone dealing with nasal cancer. Our dogs do feel our love!

    Reply
  2. Debbie talpos -

    I am sorry that the time has come. Not many people have the love, passion and commitment that you two have shown in this awful battle. Nunya is counting on you to make this decision for her and its time. Sometimes you have to hear The Lord calling. Good luck to you. You have helped so many people and other animals too.

    Reply
  3. Michelle -

    I just read your blog and I have tears rolling down my cheeks. Nunya was such a beautiful little dog!

    I fear I may be going though the same thing with my 15 yr old mixed breed dog Rudy. A couple of months ago, he started having a stuffy nose and we thought it was just allergies. When it didn’t clear up, I made his vet appt. His blood and urine were both checked and everything was fine (the doctor said for his age, he was amazed at how good his tests results were). The vet gave him a steroid shot and antibiotics to see if it was an infection in his sinuses. A few days into antibiotics, he had a nose bleed (from one side). The nose bleed was not very long 5-8 mins and then it was over. The blood was bright red and didn’t have any type of mucus or anything in it. It was just as it would be if he had cut himself and was bleeding. I contacted his vet the next morning and he said he was moving cancer and a tumor to the top of the list. I was told Rudy would need nasal x-rays. Well, we went to the vet’s office to get x-rays and after an entire day of being separated from him, I was told they were unable to do sinus x-rays. It seems Rudy has a heart arrhythmia and to sedate him for the nasal x-rays could be dangerous. They did get chest x-rays of him and found his liver, lungs, etc were ok. The vet said she could refer him to a cardio vet, but it could be very expensive and she wasn’t sure if they could help since he’s so old. Now I feel I’m on my own with his treatment. One vet suggested I try Zyrtec for the stuffy nose (this was when we thought it was just allergies), but Zyrtec seem to make him unsteady on his feet. He also had a seizure a week into taking it (he was diagnosed with epilepsy as a puppy, but hasn’t had seizures in years). Now I feed him canned food and give him two Benadryl mixed in it. I’m not really sure if it’s helping him or not, but I feel helpless not doing anything. I also ordered him a bottle of essential oil, that is supposed to be really good for pets with stuffy noses. At this time, his nose is still stuffy and at times it whistles, but he doesn’t seem to be having major difficulty. My goal at this time, is just to make sure he’s comfortable and gets anything he wants (especially his fav, pizza). When the time comes, I’ve already decided that I will not let him suffer and I will have him euthanized (a very hard decision to make). We’re also going to have him cremated, so we can have him with us.

    I guess it should be noted that Rudy was never diagnosed with cancer or tumors or anything, but at this point, his vet seems to have moved on to the next patient. I think it’s time for me to also move on… to the next vet!

    Reply
  4. Mike C -

    Alison and Thomas,

    I’m so so very sorry 🙁

    Reply
  5. Donna Gibson -

    I’m so very sorry for your loss. I know from what I’ve read here that you took the very best care of Nunya. I have a mini-dachshund male, 9 yrs old, who was diagnosed through CT scan and rhinoscopy in Jan 2013. He had been snorting discharge and had been reverse-sneezing sneezing for about 4 months before I had the procedures done. We had treated him for rhinitis prior to with no results. I had researched his symptoms and was pretty sure what the test results would be. I also knew that radiation therapy wasn’t possible due to the cost. The tests were delayed because I had my own cancer diagnosis and surgery to contend with before I could deal with his. His tumor is on the left side of his nasal cavity and there was already bone destruction visible on the CT scan. He ‘s receiving holistic treatment to slow down the tumor growth. He’s never had any nosebleeds but does snort and have clear discharge at this point. The nosebleeds are one of my biggest fears and I’m not sure how I’ll deal with them. My veterinarian indicated that the tumor would continue to grow, and be visually evident, but that he would never know the difference and wouldn’t experience pain or loss of appetite. Did your vet experts indicate differently? I’m concerned because I don’t EVER want him to be in any pain and I want to make sure that I’m watching for the signs that he is. Sometimes he looks like he’s a bit uncomfortable but he doesn’t shake or pace which are the signs I would expect I’d see if he were in pain. He does occasionally mouth breathe but that’s mainly when he’s outside. I live in Florida and the heat/humidity seems to affect his breathing when he’s out of the A/C.

    Reply
    • Alison -

      I am very sorry as well to hear that you and your dog are dealing with a nasal tumor. With Nunya, it was the breathing trouble and sneezing/congestion that was worst for her. I do not know that it was painful as much as uncomfortable. As the tumor grew though we did see signs of pain, mainly in the last couple of weeks. Her nose became sensitive to touch, and you could see a slight bulge on the bridge of her nose. My opinion is that breathing difficulty was the worst part though. Her appetite was find up until the very last day.

      If it is any comfort, the nosebleeds turned out to not be too terrible. They are definitely scary to deal with at first, however we learned to just act calm (to keep Nunya calm too), and to do our best to keep her head up to slow the bleeding and keep her from sneezing the clot out. A drop or two of Little Noses helped, and if the bleeding will not stop your vet can give some epinephrine to slow it down.

      I wish you the best of luck, and hope that your dog responds well to treatment and that you have many more happy times ahead with him.

      Alison

      Reply
  6. Michele Lee -

    Alison, I found your story just two weeks after we had to make that painful decision for our sweet 12 year old dachshund, Chase. Tears stream as I read your story. Nunya’s symptoms paralleling our boy’s. His diagnosis came in early October, and on November 25, we lost him. His tumor, which started as a slight bump and grew so large so quickly, was causing his eye to bulge greatly and on that last day, with very bad bleeding, his eye was almost shut and a blood vessel was protruding. That was the first time we noted him to be in pain, other than his discomfort in breathing. Missing him so much, and not sure why I googled tonight, but I’m glad I did, for reading your story somehow helps. I guess it’s that sense of community. We have Chase’s sister Sadie, and she is mourning with us. Thank you for sharing Nunya’s story. What wonderful parents you were to her.

    Reply
  7. Heidy -

    Thank you for posting your story, I think all of us suffer and go back and forth with “when is the right time.” Our dog has lymphoma, has taken everything TAMU can give him and its still going, just bought him some time with limoustine but we have no high hopes of that lasting too long. I think the hardest thing for dog owners is putting their beloved friend down, the sorrow, the empitness in the house, its heartbreaking…we don’t know how much time we have but his lymphoma is strong we know once he stops responding to the limoustine we are out of time. The hardest thing for me is seeing him suffer or in pain, the lymph nodes in his neck tend to enlarge to the point of blocakge and he has trouble breathing. At times they feel like two golf balls, its horrible. The worst part is that there is no answer….there is no reason.

    Reply
  8. karen -

    Just read your blog and having recently got a puppy of my own I am in tears. Your poor wee dog. Well done to you and your wife. She sounds as if she had the best owners. I have had a look at all your pictures and she was lovely. May she rest easy. Xx Karen Scotland.

    Reply
  9. Katie -

    Thank you for sharing your story. My 12 year old bulldog is down to his final days (I think?) but I’m not sure how to know when it’s time to put him down. He’s gone through all the symptoms your sweet dog did, although we decided against treatment. I’m prepared to put him down, I just don’t know when to do it. How did you know?

    Reply
    • Thomas -

      I am really sorry to hear about your bulldog.

      I asked the same question and the answer was pretty much the same from everyone – “you will just know”. At the time, this was not of much comfort. I don’t believe there is a universal time for all dogs. You know your dog’s personality, his daily routine and his likes and dislikes making you his best advocate.

      With us: Nunya’s cancer re-growth came really quickly and we could see her quality of life decreasing daily. By her last appointment at ATM, we knew we were within a few days. We scheduled the appointment and the vet who we wanted to do it was only available the following day. We agreed, but both Alison and I wanted a couple more days. As it turned out, the timing was perfect (as “perfect” as you can get for a sad event). When the appointment time came, she could no longer do the things she enjoyed. Sleep was impossible and breathing took almost all her energy. She was tired. After seeing her on her final day, there was no chance we would have waited any longer.

      Someone posted a great comment that helped me at the time and I am having a hard time finding it. As soon as I do, I will reply with it.

      Reply
  10. Matthew -

    Allison and Thomas: thank you for sharing your intimate story and for being such good dog parents. Those who never had a pet, especially a dog in this case, might find it hard to understand how their presence becomes ingrained into our very being. They are not only part of our lives, but help shape it and enjoy its moments. I am sorry for your loss.

    I found your blog extremely helpful. We recently learned our Ellie has nasal cancer as well. It’s devastating. We are trying to determine the best course of action. Reading your story – treatments and response of your sweet Nunya has given us insight and issues to consider. Thank you for your time, honesty and insight. You’ve given us a gift. Blessing to you, your family, and dog loving readers.

    Reply
    • Alison -

      Thank you Matthew for your kind words. I’m very sorry to hear of Ellie’s nasal cancer diagnosis. I will hope for a good prognosis for her and that she still has a long, happy life with you. Please let us know if there are any questions we can help answer as you explore treatment options. We are not medical professionals and what we know we learned the hard way through experience, but we have also found the pet-owner community to be wonderfully supportive and willing to give advice and encouragement where needed.

      All the best,
      Alison

      Reply
  11. shyama2 -

    We are going through the same thing right now with our pet shyama. We have opted to go the holistic way, giving her neoplasene and Yunnan byao (Chinese herb) for her bleeding and goat’s milk. Not much luck till now as the doctors we suspecting that it could be erlichiosis so she was on doxcycline. Last night she was unable to breath and kept snorting and gasping for breath. Your blog has been very helpful. We have decided not be put her through MRIs and nasal probes but I am going to talk to my vet able tramadol.

    Reply
  12. Cheryl Adair -

    My husband and I found your blog when googling post radiation cough. We found a lump under our dog’s eye on March 20 and started radiation within a month. We wasted 12 days on antibiotics for a tooth root abscess that he did not have. He is healing from the skin damage to his eyelids, nose and inner eye tissue. He is comfortable on tramadol and neurontin and piroxicam. We will see in about a month and pray he is cured. He never had any nasal discharge…maybe we caught it early enough. The similarities are amazing. We too live an hour and a half away if the traffic is good in Charlotte. We had 18 treatments and were glad to be done. It took 6-8 hours a day to get there, do the treatment, wake up, and get home. Beau was a trooper. He is a lab-shepherd mix about 90 pounds when we started. He got a special sandwich and cold Coke on the way home, because he quit eating even canned food. He never drank soft drinks before, but stuck his head in my cup and drank it all one day! Guess it settled his stomach or helped his sore throat. We have enjoyed our special time with him alone each day, and he seemed to need the break away from our other dogs. No matter what the outcome, the radiation was the right choice for him so that his eye wasn’t extruded and he has more time.

    Reply
  13. Kelly -

    Thank you for your story. I lost my beautiful, perfect Lucky last night from nasal cancer. He was the most special and incredible dog I ever had and I have had many. He had been having the open mouth breathing for a few weeks but his body found a way to compromise but then the bleeding/mucus started out of the other nostril and he would no longer eat. He was 11 years 7 months and 100 pounds mix rott and Australian shepard. I battled as all of us have with when is the right time and yes logically you know but it does not make it any easier for your heart. I wish all the people who find this site and your story find the information that helps guide them to what and when that last journey is made. I miss him so much and hope one day this horrible disease can be treated more successfully.

    Reply
  14. Michele -

    My 13 1/2 yr old Boston Terrier was just diagnosed but the past 4-5 months seem to have exactly mimicked Nunya’s initial symptoms and out attempt to unsuccessfully combat them with antihistamines and antibiotics- we finally scheduled sinus scoping and received the horrible news this morning. We are going to do a CT scan to ascertain how advanced the disease is and decide from there. My heart is broken but thank you so very much for documenting your journey and providing all of the information you have here. I am not going to waste a moment of time that I have left with my baby, my heart goes out to everyone going through this or mourning a loss – I hope I can make it through, I am profoundly sad 🙁

    Reply
  15. Tel -

    I find this thread here in August of 2015. Your story of the loyalty is exactly where I am. I’m sitting here next to my 12 year old pit bull Alli who i love more than anything in this world and she can barely breathe. She has a nasal sarcoma which is heading into the brain. She can’t sleep and she has started to collapse while sitting because she is exhausted. I have to make a decision and it is destroying me. Thank you for your story it really does help.

    Reply
  16. linda obrien -

    HI I AM WRITING THIS WITH TEARS RUNNING DOWN MY FACE AND WITH A BROKEN HEART WE WENT TO THE CLINIC YESTERDAY TO HAVE MY LITTLE CROSS JACK RUSSELL LUCKY S NOSE LOOKED AT WITH A CAMERA INSIDE A RHINO I CANT REMEMBER FULL NAME MY MIND HAS GONE BLANK ANY WAY HE SAID SHE HAS A LUMP INSIDE HER LEFT NASAL PASSAGE THEY HAVE TAKING A PIECE AWAY TO TEST I HAVE TO WAIT 10 DAYS TO GET RESULTS? SHE HAS NOT HAD ANY NOSE BLEEDS SHE HAS BEEN DOING THE REVERSE SNEEZING FOR ABOUT 4 MONTHS WHICH GRADUALLY GOT WORSE THEN SHE SEEMED TO BE HAVING PROBLEMS SLEEPING WHEN SHE CLOSED HER MOUTH BREATHING .SHE IS 11 YEARS 8 MONTHS SHE WAS A RESCUE DOG SHE IS MY WORLD AND MY LIFE IM SO WORRIED IT MIGHT BE A NASAL CANCER SHE SEEMED FIT AND HEALTHY BEFORE THE REVERSE SNEEZING STARTED SHE IS ON ANTIBIOTICS TO REDUCE THE SWELLING INSIDE NOSE I DONT NO HOW IM GOING TO HOLD IT TOGETHER WHILE WAITING FOR THE RESULTS DOES ANY ONE HAVE THIS KIND OF PROBLEMS WITH THERE DOG AND WHEN THEY GOT RESULTS BACK IT WAS JUST A LUMP AND NOT CANCER OR IS THAT JUST MY HEART BEGGING FOR THIS TO BE THE CASE? I LOVE HER SO MUCH I DONT NO HOW IM GOING TO GET THROUGH THIS ANY ONE ANY ADVICE THANKYOU

    Reply
  17. Kate -

    Thank you for this Blog. My dear sweet PTSD shepherd mix was exhibiting symptoms of the nasal cancer back in August of 2014. She also had unrelated kidney failure which took precedence in treatment. The Oncologist thought she had two weeks to live back then. Well even though she exhibited the reverse sneezing and bloody discharge from the nose, we concentrated on getting her up and running with the kidneys. It was a long road but her kidneys came back to functioning levels at which time we addressed the bloody nasal discharge. When the nasal cancer was confirmed we fought the good fight, did some antihistamines and prednisone but my ptsd baby would never be able to take being kept over night or handled frequently by vet techs and strangers so we have opted to try and make her as comfortable as possible and forgo radiation or chemo. Like Allison and Thomas’s experience, I find the difficulty in breathing to be the worst part.My girl was on prednisone for awhile now, and the prednisone helped for awhile. My girl has been on tramadol and diazepam at night to help her sleep and up until today it has helped a lot. My poor girl still eats and walks around but seems exhausted as she can not sleep. She gurgles and grunts and makes a throat clearing noise while she is laying down trying to sleep. I too am finding it hard to figure out when it is ” the right time” to help her to heaven. Today is a bad day. I know the time is soon. MY struggle is when “is it time” .

    Reply
  18. Stacey Breaux -

    Allison and Thomas,
    Thank you so much for sharing your story. My condolonces to you guys for the loss of your precious baby!
    I found your blog to be very helpful. I am unfortuantly going through a similar ordeal with my 9 yr old yellow lab. Our precious boy started with nosebleeds, sneezing, and nasal discharge about a month ago. After a visit to our local vet, we were assured that it was caused by allergies and he would soon start feeling better after the allergy meds. About a week after he started his allergy treatment I noticed what looked like an ulcer that had came out right on the edge of his nostril. We returned back to the vet and this time it was not the news we were hoping for. Since there is no oncology services in our area he was referred to an oncology vet about 1hr away. We took him there and after several visits which consisted of bloodwork, catscans, X-rays, and biopsys, it was confirmed that our baby had cancer. We were devistated!!! They recomended a nosectomy with chemo and radiation to follow the surgery. We scheduled the surgery, then a day before the surgery was to take place we were once again faced with more upsetting news. The biopsy showed the cancer to be very invasive and aggresive and even with those treatment options survival was only 2-4 months. At this point, we decided not to put him through the treatment as we did not want him to suffer during his final time here. He has had some changes in breathing recently and we know that will only get worse, but he still appears to be healthy, happy, and full of life.He is currently on prednisone, tramadol, and antihistimines which im sure helps him to feel better, We know its only a matter of time before we will be faced with another dreaded decision. Although we are totally devistated and heartbroken, we know we have to do whats right for him and sometimes thats letting go! Its just crazy how whats best for them can hurt us so much. Until then we will continue to love him and make him as happy as we can.

    Reply
    • adopt from a shelter -

      My heart goes out to you and your precious I just sent my best friend in the world to heaven on 3-15-16. She fought hard and was staying alive for me I’m sure. She was exhausted from lack of sleep from the growth in her nose. The good thing was the prednisone worked for awhile and gave us extra time for walks and car rides and the tramadol relived her pain and didn’t knock her out or make her lethargic. I might also suggest you ask the doctor about diazapam at night for your precious. It will help her rest. Take lots of pictures while you can and do all the, special things you can now, while your precious can still enjoy it. I miss my best friend but I’m glad I got the extra time after diagnosis to spend with her.

      Reply
      • Stacey -

        I’m so sorry for the loss of your best friend! I can’t imagine my life without my big boy! My heart is so torn. I just hope I made the right decision for him. Thank you for your suggestions, I will do that. I do see a difference in him since he started on the prednisone, but I do know that unfortunately it’s temporary. I cherish every new day we get to be together. We have been taking many jeep rides, playing outside with his little brother which he loves,enjoying way too many of his favorite treats, and having lots of snuggle time. I just hope in the end I can find peace with my decision!!

        Reply
        • adopt from a shelter -

          The treatment you have chosen leaves the least side effects and for me gave my beloved the best quality of life for her remaining time. My girl could not have withstood the radiation and chemo or all the handling by vet personnel that a more aggressive treatment would have required. So it made my decision to forgo chemo and radiation easier and I have no regrets n that decision. The one I had and still have on my mind was when is it appropriate to say enough. People say you will know. I didn’t know even in the end. With the help of my vet my beloved ‘ s life was extended almost 18 months on the prednisone. She would have fought on even though she literally could not sleep even when medicated. That was the hard part for me. She fought to stay with me even when she was exhausted and weak. What helped was knowing that she ate her favorite foods, did her favorite things every day and never spent a night away from us during her last 18 months. Car rides and walks and baked chicken every day. When she stopped eating anything at all, we made the decision.

          Reply
          • Stacey -

            Thank you so much for taking time to “talk” to me!! Our vet here felt the same way about treatment options. He felt that although our boy was healthy, he would not do well with the chemo and radiation especially while trying to revover from such a huge surgery!! I don’t think we will be as fortunate as you were to have that long. We are only one month after diagnosis and we are already starting to see signs of distress and the tumor is visibly getting bigger every day!! I just try to take it day by day and don’t take any day for granted!!

    • Alison -

      I’m so sorry you and your precious lab are going through this. There is no one right way to handle or treat canine cancer, as each case is so different. It sounds like you are doing everything you can to help your guy and make him comfortable, and that is doing right by him. He is lucky to have a family who loves him and will be there for him. My heart goes out to you and your family.
      Alison

      Reply
  19. adopt from a shelter -

    I pray the prednisone has some effect to give you more time. The diazepam will definitely help him sleep more relaxed. Hugs.

    Reply
  20. Judy Cline -

    Thank you for sharing your story. It mirrors my dog Bear’s experience in many ways, but luckily I’ve had more time with her than you. I also missed having to deal with a major nose bleed until a couple of weeks ago. The first symptom she had was a bloody discharge from her nose. My vet told me that it was probably cancer, so I transferred her care to the oncologists at the University of Wisconsin Vet School. An MRI was done and she had an aggressive but benign nasal tumor which at the time of diagnosis filled her right nasal cavity completely. They thought she might live a couple of months without treatment, but the nasal tumor would continue to grow and her quality of life would take a sharp decline.

    She underwent 10 mostly consecutive days of radiation (2 weeks of weekday application, with the weekend off), and other than being really tired after the last treatment, had no major adverse reactions to the radiation. She lost a little hair, which has since grown in white, and she had some short-term mouth pain which did not affect her appetite. I was told at the time of radiation that it could prolong her life anywhere from a couple of months to 19 months. She didn’t have chemo; it was not recommended at all, even before they knew the tumor was benign.

    That was in June 2014, and she’s still with me today. She is a 13-year-old black lab, paired with whatever jumped over the fence the day of her conception. We think husky or newfie, based on her characteristics. She has arthritis, particularly in her rear end, so she’s on Rimadyl and Tramadol. Since having her first major nose bleed 2 weeks ago, she’s also on a Chinese herb called yunnan balyao, which has stopped the bloody discharge completely, at least for now. Yes, she sleeps a lot because of the Tramadol, but she’s always eager for a car ride, and trips to the dog park almost daily. I know the end is coming, but it’s not going to be this week, or maybe not this month. Who knows, maybe she’ll get to make snow angels again before she goes.

    I’m sorry for Nunya’s owners, and all of the others who have posted here about the loss of their dogs. Having gone through to the end with 5 other dogs, I know Bear will let me know when it’s time; they almost always do. I just regret that, since I rescued Bear when she was 6 1/2, our time together was not as long as it might have been. She’s a wonderful dog, sweet and loving. I will miss her greatly when it’s time.

    Reply
  21. Bonnie -

    Why is canine nasal cancer considered rare when so many dogs are being diagnosed with it? My 14 yr lab had this insidious disease the last year of her life. We were discouraged by our vet from taking the treatment route taken with Nunya. We treated our precious girl with natural products sold by Pet Alive for respiratory distress and nasal congestion which were surprisingly helpful. She passed in our arms one year after diagnosis and we will forever wonder about our selfishness in keeping her alive versus the alternative. Now, six years later, another precious lab, just 5 yrs old, awakened me in the middle of the night, I thought for a bathroom outing, but then I found the familiar, unwelcome, mysterious blood drops on the floor and after close inspection of our girl, found no injury or wound on her that would explain where those blood drops came from. I pray we are not headed down this well worn heart breaking path of nasal cancer again.

    Reply

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